The Egyptian, Masonic, Satanic Connection

I was drawn to this book because I wanted an in-depth, not-sugar-coated look at the occult and its impact in modern society. I kept seeing references to this book online, and figure it must be the go-to source of material for this subject matter.

However, at 109 pages, I really feel like the book does very little to fully explain Egyptian, Masonic or Satanic content in any significant way. I understand what the book is trying to do — briefly cover what each of the three are about, spend a couple chapters saying they’re linked to one another, and then have a couple chapters devoted to real-world crimes occult followers commit … but throughout my reading of it I felt like there was very little substance to it all. I mean it’s pretty obvious Ancient Mystery Schools, Egyptian Mythology, Masonic rites and Satanism are all connected and it’s highly unlikely anyone picking up this hard-to-find, expensive book would be unaware of any of these.

What I expected the book to do was explain — with real-world crime cases one after another — how the occult was involved. Instead, we get about 10 pages of low-resolution kids’ drawings, vague references to a few cases where actual names are used … and that’s it. Buried in the back of the book are all the references cited, but what the book really needed was more real-world examples in modern society, and less hard-to-read verbatim quotes about very cryptic passages in very old books.

It’s not a bad book, but considering its high price (over $20 new, for a small-format and roughly ~110 page book), it’s hard to justify buying it. I also want to point out the book is in serious need of spelling/grammar editing and even basic typesetting, which actually does hurt its readability.

I’ve become a student at Liberty University

As of August 1st, 2017, I have officially enrolled at Liberty University as a student.

Nearly a year and a half ago, I started this site with the desire to document my journey of self-study regarding The Bible and God. Since then I’ve been pretty productive in most months, providing commentary on Christian films, books, documentaries and online classes.

Unfortunately, one thing that has always been in the back of my mind is the idea that I may be “missing out” on major parts of the Bible and understanding of more intricate, larger-in-scope Christian topics. So, since 2015 I’ve been researching different possibilities school-wise, and as of the time when I started this site, I just wasn’t sure how to proceed.

In my very first post I wrote this: “I really do need to learn more, and going to church in-person is a real struggle for me…so this online, distance-learning approach is the best way. -&- Also, at the end of the day I’m not looking for a degree — a degree is nice…but a degree is a very worldly thing. -&- what I’m looking for is a much better understanding of The Bible, how it relates to the world we live in at this point in time…and a better relationship with God.

As you can see, I wasn’t necessarily looking for a degree early on (as I already have multiple degrees) and I was very concerned about a degree “focus” being a “worldly” thing I’d be pursuing, vs. a closer relationship with God. A year and a half later, I’ve realized that I need to make the next step and get actual training from experts (at what is the largest Christian university in the world), vs. trying to learn on my own, all the time. Surprisingly, of all the major, regionally accredited Christian schools I looked at, Liberty was the most affordable. It also was the easiest to enroll in, considering its reputation — no unnecessary amount of paperwork/essays/references/etc. — many schools wanted multiple church references.

This program I’m now enrolled in consists of 20 courses, and if all goes well I plan to study more things at Liberty. It feels wonderful to be a real student again (last time was 10 years ago exactly, in 2007!), and at the end of August classes officially start (I still haven’t decided what I’ll be taking first). Lastly, I did look into pursuing more classes at Koinonia, Moody Bible Institute and other lesser-known, less-accredited Bible schools (primarily to save money), but Liberty is what I’ve found to be the best mix of reputation, affordability and flexibility, by far.